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Boomers More Likely to Try Alternative Medicine
Middle-age adults are more likely than older or younger people to use complementary and alternative medicine, says a Wake Forest University School of Medicine study. Researchers analyzed data collected from 31,044 people in the United States who took part in the 2002 National Health Interview Survey. Midlife adults entered adulthood at a time of more widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine CAM in the population and when public health polic ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17
Combining Mainstream, Alternative Therapies Brings Back Pain Relief
Used together, conventional and complementary alternative treatments help patients ease their low back pain better than using mainstream treatment alone, U.S. research shows. The small study included 13 patients who received integrated care and six patients who received usual care. The integrative care team at Brigham and Women s Hospital in Boston included experts in acupuncture, chiropractic, internal medicine, massage therapy, neurology, nursing, nutrit ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17
Added Treatment Won't Speed Whiplash Recovery
Aggressive treatment of patients with whiplash doesn t speed their recovery, Canadian research suggests. University of Toronto researchers examined the treatment received by almost 1,700 whiplash patients. They found that increasing the intensity of care to more than two visits to a general practitioner, or adding chiropractic care to general practitioner care, was actually associated with slower recovery. The results, published in the June issue of the jo ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
An estimated 38 percent of U.S. adults and 12 percent of children use some type of complementary and alternative medicine, a new U.S. government survey finds. Complementary and alternative medicine -- sometimes called CAM -- is an umbrella term for a collection of wide-ranging medical and health care systems, practices and products that aren t generally considered conventional medicine. It includes herbal supplements, meditation, chiropractic treatment and ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17
Americans Spend Billions on Alternative Medicine
Americans spent 33.9 billion out-of-pocket on complementary and alternative medicine in 2007 alone, U.S. health officials report. CAM includes medical practices and products, such as herbal supplements, meditation, chiropractic and acupuncture, which are not part of conventional medicine. The bottom line is that Americans spend a lot of money on CAM products, classes or materials or practitioner visits, Dr. Josephine P. Briggs, director of the U.S. Nationa ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17
Chiropractic Spinal Manipulation Won't Cause Chest Injuries, Study Contends
Chest compressions during chiropractic spinal manipulation result in little or no risk of chest injury, according to new research. The study, published in the May 13 online edition of the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics , measured and examined the force of chest compressions ranging from typical to extremely rigorous and found all to be well under the threshold for injury. Results from this preliminary study showed that maximum chest ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17
Study Questions Chiropractic's Impact on Back Pain
For the millions of Americans with chronic low back pain, a silver bullet to alleviate the condition has yet to be identified, a new study suggests. Reviewing 26 studies comparing spinal manipulative therapy SMT to other treatments such as medication, exercise or physical therapy, researchers from the Netherlands found that SMT appears to be no better or worse than other options at relieving back pain long-term. The analyses indicated that SMT -- which inv ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17
Many Health-Care Workers Have Turned to Alternative Medicine
Three out of every four U.S. health-care workers use some form of complementary or alternative medicine or practice to help stay healthy, a new report shows. What s more, doctors, nurses and their assistants, health technicians, and healthcare administrators were actually more likely than the general public to use any number of wide-ranging alternative medicine options, including massage, yoga, acupuncture, Pilates or herbal medicines. No one has really do ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17
Yoga, Stretching Classes Outdo Self-Care for Back Pain: Study
Yoga instruction and conventional stretching classes are equally good at relieving discomfort from chronic moderate lower-back pain, new research suggests. Both are also better than trying to manage pain on your own by following the exercise, lifestyle and flare-up advice provided in self-help books, the study found. For a person with garden-variety back pain who is willing to move their body, the bottom-line is that a beginner s yoga class geared for back ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17
Yoga Gets Women With Back Pain Moving: Study
Another study finds that yoga classes can improve back function among people with chronic or recurrent lower back pain. While the British researchers found that yoga could help people move about and perform tasks, the ancient practice did not appear to reduce back pain itself. The finding comes on the heels of similar results from a U.S. investigation published last week by University of Washington researchers in the Archives of Internal Medicine . That st ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17
Spinal Manipulation, Home Exercise May Ease Neck Pain
Spinal manipulation and home exercise are more effective at relieving neck pain in the long term than medications, according to new research. People undergoing spinal manipulation therapy for neck pain also reported greater satisfaction than people receiving medication or doing home exercises. We found that there are some viable treatment options for neck pain, said Gert Bronfort, vice president of research at the Wolfe-Harris Center for Clinical Studies a ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17
Science Reveals How Owls Avoid Stroke While Rotating Heads
What a hoot Scientists say they ve discovered how owls can almost fully rotate their heads without damaging the blood vessels in their necks or cutting off the blood supply to their brains. Owls have four major bone structure and blood vessel adaptations that prevent injury when they rotate their head. Humans lack these adaptations, which helps explain why people are more vulnerable to neck injuries, according to the Johns Hopkins researchers. Until now, b ...
Healthday - Thu. Sep 17