fb_thumb
Gene therapy treats all muscles in the body in muscular dystrophy dogs
COLUMBIA, Mo. shy -- Muscular dystrophy, which affects approximately 250,000 people in the U.S., occurs when damaged muscle tissue is replaced with fibrous, fatty or bony tissue and loses function. For years, scientists have searched for a way to successfully treat the most common form of the disease, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy DMD , which primarily affects boys. Now, a team of University of Missouri researchers have successfully treated dogs with DMD and ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 23
A longer look at treatments for leg length discrepancies
WASHINGTON, DC - When balancing treatment options for a child with a significant difference in leg length, doctors typically advise families about the risks and benefits of surgeries to either shorten or elongate one of the limbs. New research suggests they may also want to consider how the child s ultimate height will affect his or her income as an adult. In a study to be presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics AAP National Conference Exhibition i ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 23
Penn researchers examine effects of federal recommendations on cartilage repai...
PHILADELPHIA - More than 21 million people in the United States suffer from cartilage damage, and if left untreated, cartilage defects can cause disability and more widespread joint disease. In recent years, scientists have focused on development of new treatments for cartilage repair. But in the past two decades there has been little to no adherence to the recommendations published by U.S. and European regulatory agencies on the manner in which translatio ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Oct 22
Muscle relaxant or opioid combined with NSAID does not improve low back pain
Among patients with acute, low back pain presenting to an emergency department, neither the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug NSAID naproxen combined with oxycodone acetaminophen or the muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine provided better pain relief or improvement in functional outcomes than naproxen combined with placebo, according to a study in the October 20 issue of JAMA . Low back pain LBP is responsible for 2.4 percent of visits to U.S. emergency depar ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Oct 20
Benefit of early physical therapy for low-back pain appears modest
Early physical therapy for recent-onset low back pain resulted in statistically significant improvement in disability compared to usual care, but the improvement was modest and did not achieve a difference considered clinically important at the individual patient level, according to a study in the Oct. 13 issue of JAMA . Lifetime prevalence of low back pain LBP is about 70 percent and accounts for 2 percent to 5 percent of all physician visits. The effect ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Oct 13
Greater neighborhood access to fast-food outlets linked to lower bone mass in ...
Nyon, Switzerland - October 13, 2015--New research from the MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit at the University of Southampton in the UK indicates that neighbourhood exposure to fast food outlets is potentially linked to poorer bone development in early childhood. The study looked at the bone mineral density BMD and bone mineral content BMC of 1107 children at birth and at four and or six years of age and compared the data to the number of supermarkets, hea ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Oct 13
Researchers use 'Avatar' experiments to get leg up on locomotion
Simple mechanical descriptions of the way people and animals walk, run, jump and hop liken whole leg behavior to a spring or pogo stick. But until now, no one has mapped the body s complex physiology - which in locomotion includes multiple leg muscle-tendons crossing the hip, knee and ankle joints, the weight of a body, and control signals from the brain - with the rather simple physics of spring-like limb behavior. Using an Avatar -like bio-robotic motor ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Oct 12
RNA editing technique treats severe form of muscular dystrophy
Father, whose two sons have the disease, encourages scientist to try technique Dr. Elizabeth McNally is a world expert researching rare form of muscular dystrophy Technique works in mice and human cells Treatment being licensed and developed with goal of clinical trials CHICAGO --- An RNA editing technique called exon skipping has shown preliminary success in treating a rare and severe form of muscular dystrophy that currently has no treatment, based on a ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Oct 12
MS may start later for those who spend teenage summers in the sun
MINNEAPOLIS - A study of people with multiple sclerosis MS found that those who spent time in the sun every day during the summer as teens developed the disease later than those reporting not spending time in the sun every day. The study, which was published in the October 7, 2015, online issue of Neurology reg , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, also found that people who were overweight at age 20 developed the disease earlier than ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Oct 8
Therapy reduces the risk of fragility fractures by 40 percent
ROSEMONT, Ill.--Osteoporosis, a disease of progressive bone loss, affects 70 percent of the U.S. population older than age 50 one in two women--and one in five men. These individuals are at risk for fragility fractures, a break that results from a fall, or occurs in the absence of obvious trauma, and most commonly seen in the wrist, the upper arm, the hip, and the spine. People who sustain a fragility fracture are at a higher risk for future fractures and ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Oct 8
Risk profiling is key to managing pain in era of opioid abuse
Patients undergoing rehabilitation for physical injuries and their physicians can better understand who is most at risk of abusing opioids by reviewing their family history, lifestyle and environment for critical cues about susceptibility to addiction, according to physical medicine and rehabilitation experts. Risk assessments are one of the few tools available for patients and physicians concerned about using opioids to manage debilitating pain during phy ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Oct 6
Women with knee osteoarthritis experience greater pain sensitivity than men
Among patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, women experienced greater sensitivity to various pain modalities--such as lower tolerance to heat, cold, and pressure--and greater widespread pain than men. The findings may be helpful for clinicians as they decide which treatments are best for different patients. Additional studies on the mechanisms involved the sex differences observed this study may also help researchers develop new treatment strategies fo ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Oct 6