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Research is lacking on marijuana's effects in patients with rheumatic diseases
Although there are anecdotal reports indicating that cannabinoids, especially marijuana or herbal cannabis , may be of therapeutic benefit for some patients with rheumatic complaints, a new review published in Arthritis Care Research , a journal of the American College of Rheumatology ACR , finds scant scientific evidence supporting any use of cannabinoids in rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, not a single controlled study has examined herbal cannabis in the ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Nov 9
Improve individual skills supported by BigData
Running is one of the most popular sports. However, not many runners have received formal training on running. Associate Professor Shinichi YAMAGIWA of the University of Tsukuba and his colleagues have developed a system for improving running skills based on big data analysis. Dr. YAMAGIWA, Associate Professor Yoshinobu KAWAHARA of Osaka University and Mizuno Corporation have jointly developed a technology that instructs the ideal running motions based on ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Nov 9
Meniscus injury: Real surgery or sham surgery -- which is better for patients?
Patients with meniscus lesions benefit from a combination of sham surgery and physiotherapy just as much as from a real surgical procedure-- this was the conclusion reached in the Finnish FIDELITY study published in 2013. Ever since then, there has been considerable discussion about the benefits of meniscus surgery compared with physiotherapy. After all, about 300,000 meniscus procedures were performed in Germany in 2013. The question is Should the non-sur ...
EurekAlert - Sat. Nov 7
Trial reveals evidence of long-term benefits for people with chronic neck pain
A large scale investigation by researchers at the University of York found that the use of Alexander Technique or acupuncture can significantly relieve chronic neck pain. Chronic neck pain is a difficult condition to treat, and previous research shows that single interventions generally do not provide long term benefits. After evaluating the benefits of Alexander Technique or acupuncture, the researchers from the Department of Health Sciences at York concl ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Nov 3
Increasing vitamin D supplementation
This news release is available in German . Osteoporosis is one of the chief reasons why the elderly often suffer broken bones from relatively minor injuries. Postmenopausal women in particular experience a relatively rapid loss in bone mass due to a reduced concentration of oestrogen, which is responsible for strong bone growth during youth. Maintaining bone mass requires physical exercise and vitamin D, which is mainly produced in the skin with the help o ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Nov 3
Muscle loss linked with falls and fractures in elderly
Older people with an age-related loss of muscle mass and strength may be at greater risk of falling and bone fractures, according to new research led by the University of Southampton. A study by an international team of researchers into sarcopenia -where muscles lose form and function with age - found that those with the condition reported higher numbers of falls in the last year and a higher prevalence of fractures. The decline in muscle mass between the ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Nov 3
Achilles tendon ruptures missed in 1 of 4 cases, but surgery not needed for most
CHICAGO--October 29, 2015-- Achilles tendon disorders are common and often misdiagnosed, with about 25 percent of ruptures missed during initial examination, but the prognosis is favorable for the vast majority of patients, according to researchers from Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine and the Rothman Institute of Jefferson Medical College. Their clinical review, published in the November edition of The Journal of the American Osteopathic As ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 30
Manipulating the antennae on cells promises new treatments for osteoarthritis
Bioengineers from Queen Mary University of London QMUL have shown for the first time that lithium chloride, a common drug used to treat mental health disorders, could offer an effective treatment against osteoarthritis by disrupting the length of the cells antennae called primary cilia. Publishing in the journal FASEB , the scientists show that medical manipulation of the primary cilia, which are tiny hair-like structures protruding from the surface of mos ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Oct 29
CWRU biologists find keys to driving a cockroach
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have identified neurons in a cockroach s brain that control whether the insect walks slow or fast, turns right or left or downshifts to climb. By selectively stimulating these same neurons, the scientists can cause the roach to replicate the movements. The finding makes clear how the insect brain directs the body to move in an intended direction, including changes in joint coordination and reflexes. The centra ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 23
Gene therapy treats all muscles in the body in muscular dystrophy dogs
COLUMBIA, Mo. shy -- Muscular dystrophy, which affects approximately 250,000 people in the U.S., occurs when damaged muscle tissue is replaced with fibrous, fatty or bony tissue and loses function. For years, scientists have searched for a way to successfully treat the most common form of the disease, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy DMD , which primarily affects boys. Now, a team of University of Missouri researchers have successfully treated dogs with DMD and ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 23
A longer look at treatments for leg length discrepancies
WASHINGTON, DC - When balancing treatment options for a child with a significant difference in leg length, doctors typically advise families about the risks and benefits of surgeries to either shorten or elongate one of the limbs. New research suggests they may also want to consider how the child s ultimate height will affect his or her income as an adult. In a study to be presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics AAP National Conference Exhibition i ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 23
Penn researchers examine effects of federal recommendations on cartilage repai...
PHILADELPHIA - More than 21 million people in the United States suffer from cartilage damage, and if left untreated, cartilage defects can cause disability and more widespread joint disease. In recent years, scientists have focused on development of new treatments for cartilage repair. But in the past two decades there has been little to no adherence to the recommendations published by U.S. and European regulatory agencies on the manner in which translatio ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Oct 22