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Disjointed: Cell differences may explain why rheumatoid arthritis varies by lo...
Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Pennsylvania and China, report that not only are there distinct differences in key cellular processes and molecular signatures between rheumatoid arthritis RA and osteoarthritis OA but, more surprisingly, there are joint-specific differences in RA. The findings help explain, in part, why drugs treating RA vary in effect -- why, for example, a treatment that might w ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Jun 10
World's first child-exoskeleton for spinal muscular atrophy
Furthermore, it will also be used in physiotherapy in hospitals to prevent the secondary effects associated with the loss of mobility in this illness. The technology, which has been patented and licensed jointly by CSIC the Spanish National Research Council and its technology-based business unit, Marsi Bionics, is currently in the preclinical phase. The brace consists of long support rods, or orthoses, which are adjusted to fit around the child s legs and ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Jun 8
Study finds opposing trends in hospitalizations, costs for gout and rheumatoid...
While hospitalizations related to rheumatoid arthritis have dropped considerably over the past two decades, hospitalizations primarily associated with gout have increased dramatically. These results of a study described in a research letter in the June 7, 2016 issue of JAMA reflect improved management of rheumatoid arthritis patients and both an increased prevalence and persistent suboptimal care of gout. Our findings provide a remarkably encouraging bench ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Jun 7
Study questions cancer link with bone growth factor for spinal surgery
June 7, 2016 - Adding to previous evidence, a study based on a statewide cancer database shows no increase in cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with the bone-promoting growth factor recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein rhBMP . The study appears in Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer. At least through the first several years, patients who receiving rhBMP during spinal fusion surgery are at no higher risk of cancer than those un ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Jun 7
Study finds minimal risk for serious infection with 'in bone' prosthesis
A new study in today s issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery found minimal risk for severe infection with osseointegrated implants--a newer prosthetic system, press-fitted directly into the femur bone--that enables bone growth over a metal, robotic prosthetic limb in patients with above knee amputations. For more than 600 years, patients with amputations above the knee received a prosthesis that fit over the skin and soft tissue of the amputation ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jun 2
Deployed US military service members more likely to suffer noncombat bone and ...
ROSEMONT, Ill. June 1, 2016 --Since September 11, 2001, an estimated 60,000 U.S. military service members have been injured in combat during the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Nearly 45,000 75 percent of all combat injuries are caused by improvised explosive devices, also known as IEDs. Approximately two out of five service members with combat injuries 40 percent have suffered fractures, traumatic amputations, and injuries to the spine. Many of these injuries ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jun 2
Cell insights shed light on how muscle-wasting disease takes hold
Fresh insights into how our cells control muscle development could aid understanding of muscular dystrophy and other inherited diseases. Scientists have discovered a way in which proteins in our cells help to control genes in our DNA, which are involved in forming muscle. Their finding explains an apparent paradox in which proteins linked to a series of genetic diseases can be found in cells throughout the body, but impact only on some tissue types. Resear ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jun 2
Scientists discover and test new class of pain relievers
DURHAM, N.C. -- A research team at Duke University has discovered a potential new class of small-molecule drugs that simultaneously block two sought-after targets in the treatment of pain. These proof-of-concept experiments, published June 1 in Scientific Reports , could lead to the development of a new drug to treat conditions including skin irritation and itching, headaches, jaw pain, and abdominal pain stemming from the pancreas and colon. More than 100 ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Jun 1
New muscular dystrophy drug target identified
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have discovered that muscle cells affected by muscular dystrophy contain high levels of an enzyme that impairs muscle repair. This finding provides a new target for potential drug treatments for the disease, which currently has no cure. Muscular dystrophy MD is an inherited genetic condition that gradually causes a weakening of muscles. Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD is the most common, and one of the most severe ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Jun 1
Premature babies may grow up to have weaker bones
Among the many important processes that happen during a woman s last few weeks of pregnancy is the transfer of calcium to the growing foetus to boost bone development. But what happens if this transfer is interrupted when a baby is born prematurely The answer, it seems, is lower peak bone mass as an adult, compared to adults who were born full term. Adults who were born full term but were small for their gestational age also had lower bone mass. These find ...
EurekAlert - Tue. May 31
Cells engineered from muscular dystrophy patients offer clues to variations in...
Johns Hopkins researchers report they have inadvertently found a way to make human muscle cells bearing genetic mutations from people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD . A report on the feat, published online in the journal Cell Reports on May 26, should shed light on how subtle genetic differences among DMD patients produce symptoms with a wide range of severity and disability. The cells, they say, could also be used to test new therapies. The serendip ...
EurekAlert - Thu. May 26
Couples study ties anger to heart problems, stonewalling to back pain
If you rage with frustration during a marital spat, watch your blood pressure. If you keep a stiff upper lip, watch your back. New research from the University of California, Berkeley, and Northwestern University, based on how couples behave during conflicts, suggests outbursts of anger predict cardiovascular problem. Conversely, shutting down emotionally or stonewalling during conflict raises the risk of musculoskeletal ailments such as a bad back or stif ...
EurekAlert - Tue. May 24