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More than half of lawn mower injuries to children require an amputation
Warnings, operating instructions, design modifications and safety tips all aim to protect children and teens from injuries caused by lawn mowers. However, a study presented today at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons AAOS found that an alarming number of serious injuries still occur, with 53 percent of injured children requiring an amputation. Researchers reviewed data from the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study on the 1 ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Mar 1
Youngest and oldest patients more likely to report pain, lower activity levels...
While all age groups report comparable improvement in range of motion following total knee replacement surgery TKR , new research presented today at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons AAOS found that patients age 45 and younger, and those age 75 and older, report more pain and less activity following the procedure. Total knee replacement TKR is one of the most popular elective orthopaedic surgeries, with the overall inc ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Mar 1
New surgical tool keeps orthopedic procedures on target
In the United States alone, hip fracture fixation is performed on 258,000 patients spinal fusion accounts for 350,000 persons every year. As the population ages, the number of these surgical procedures will continue to grow. Common orthopedic procedures, such as hip and pelvic fracture surgery as well as spinal fusion, require the accurate positioning of a thin metallic wire to guide the positioning of a fixating screw. However, the surgical procedure is o ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Feb 24
New surgical technique improves biological hip joint replacement
According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, more than 300,000 total hip replacements are performed in the United States each year. The procedure reduces pain and restores mobility. However, for younger, more active patients, an artificial hip has a limited lifetime and usually requires restricted activity. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have tested a new biological technique that may provide better and lo ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Feb 22
Study shows dried plums provide protection from bone loss due to radiation
COLLEGE STATION -- Dr. Nancy Turner, a Texas A M AgriLife Research scientist in College Station, was one of a team of researchers who recently studied different interventions to protect from radiation-induced bone loss. Their paper, Dried Plum Protects from Bone Loss Caused by Iodizing Radiation, was recently published in Scientific Reports and can be found at http www. nature. com articles srep21343 . Other institutions involved in the study were the Bone ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Feb 22
Phase 2 clinical trial to treat rare hereditary muscle disease shows promise
Amsterdam, NL, Feb. 22, 2016 - Researchers present the first clinical study that provides evidence that an extended-release sialic acid supplement may stabilize muscle strength in patients with GNE myopathy GNEM , a rare hereditary, progressive, adult-onset muscle disease. Patients with GNEM have mutations in a gene controlling a key enzyme in the synthesis pathway for sialic acid SA . They typically experience distal muscle weakness, commonly presenting a ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Feb 22
Bariatric surgery before knee replacement cost-effective in improving outcomes...
Obesity is not only a risk factor for developing knee arthritis. It is also linked to less favorable outcomes after joint replacement surgery. A study at Hospital for Special Surgery HSS in New York City finds that bariatric surgery prior to total knee replacement TKR is a cost-effective option to improve outcomes. The research appeared in the January issue of The Journal of Bone Joint Surgery . It is well known that obesity takes a toll on one s health. B ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Feb 19
Smart skin made of recyclable materials may transform medicine and robotics
Smart skin that can respond to external stimuli could have important applications in medicine and robotics. Using only items found in a typical household, researchers have created multi-sensor artificial skin that s capable of sensing pressure, temperature, humidity, proximity, pH, and air flow. The flexible, paper-based skin is layered onto a post-it note, with paper, aluminum foil, lint-free wipes, and pencil lines acting as sensing components. Being mad ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Feb 19
Better survival of implanted cells improves healing of bone fractures
To treat a complicated, non-healing bone defect, surgeons often use an implant with living cells to promote bone repair, but the implanted cells have a small chance of surviving because they are not prepared for a lack of oxygen and nutrients at the fracture site. Scientists from KU Leuven, Belgium, have now improved survival of these bone cells by preconditioning them to withstand the harmful environment before implantation. Their findings were published ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Feb 19
Ensuring ongoing care for patients treated during short-term surgical mission ...
ROSEMONT, Ill. Feb. 17, 2016 --Each year, hundreds of orthopaedic surgeons travel to developing countries to treat and care for patients. Yet despite the successful completion of many surgical procedures on patients who may not otherwise have access to care, adequate follow-up--so critical to optimal outcomes--is not always available or guaranteed. A new study appearing in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery found that a sustainable surgical follow-up pr ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Feb 18
Physical therapy cuts urine leaks dramatically for women with osteoporosis
CLEVELAND, Ohio February 17, 2016 --After menopause, women with osteoporosis struggle more with urinary incontinence than women with healthy bones do. But physical therapy that includes pelvic floor muscle training can produce dramatic improvements, shows a study published online today in Menopause , the journal of The North American Menopause Society. The study is the first-ever randomized, controlled trial of physical therapy for these urinary troubles i ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Feb 17
Stem cell gene therapy could be key to treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Scientists at the UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research and Center for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy at UCLA have developed a new approach that could eventually be used to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The stem cell gene therapy could be applicable for 60 percent of people with Duchenne, which affects approximately 1 in 5,000 boys in the U.S. and is the most common fatal childhood genetic disease. The approach ...
EurekAlert - Sat. Feb 13