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Don't freestyle 'swimmer's shoulder' injuries
ROSEMONT, Ill. August 4, 2016 --Elite and competitive swimmers log between 60,000 and 80,000 meters weekly--swimming the length of an Olympic-sized pool 1,200 times--which places significant stress on their shoulder joints. The upper body provides 90 percent of the propulsive force to move through the water. Due to the amount of force generated and the range of motion required to swim efficiently, the shoulder needs to have perfect mechanics to avoid injur ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Aug 5
Teamwork, communication training recommended to ensure surgical safety
ROSEMONT, Ill. Aug. 5, 2016 --Patient safety before, during, and after surgery requires an appropriately educated, committed and empowered health care team, according to recommendations being presented today at the inaugural National Surgical Patient Safety Summit NSPSS . The two-day event, which includes more than 100 representatives from medical professional associations, insurers, health care systems, payers and government agencies, is sponsored by the ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Aug 5
Why you're stiff in the morning: Your body suppresses inflammation when you sl...
New research published online in The FASEB Journal , describes a protein created by the body s biological clock that actively represses inflammatory pathways within the affected limbs during the night. This protein, called CRYPTOCHROME, has proven anti-inflammatory effects in cultured cells and presents new opportunities for the development of drugs that may be used to treat inflammatory diseases and conditions, such as arthritis. By understanding how the ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Aug 5
Clinical assessment of muscular fatigue
The Open Orthopaedics Journal recently published Inter-rater Reliability of Sustained Aberrant Movement Patterns as a Clinical Assessment of Muscular Fatigue by Frank Aerts, PT, DSc, OCS, CMPT, CMP, CMET Kathy Carrier, PT, DSc, CLT-LANA and Becky Alwood, OTR, MHS, CLT . A patient s response to a therapeutic exercise program depends on the effectiveness of the program and the value of its delivery system. When utilizing exercise as a therapeutic interventio ...
EurekAlert - Sat. Jul 30
The impact of private sector contracts on NHS provision and treatment inequali...
Patient choice and the use of the private sector for hip surgery in Scotland was found to be associated with a decrease in NHS provision and may have contributed to an increase in age-related and socio-economic treatment inequalities, according to research by Queen Mary University of London QMUL . The study, published in the Journal of Public Health by Oxford University Press, is the first to look at the impact of diverting NHS funds to the private sector ...
EurekAlert - Sat. Jul 30
Axial spondyloarthritis: Patients see sustained benefit with certolizumab pegol
Researchers are reporting that early rapid improvements in the signs and symptoms of axial spondyloarthritis in patients treated with certolizumab pegol are maintained at 4 years.
Medical News Today - Thu. Jul 21
Regenerative medicine improves strength and function in severe muscle injuries
PITTSBURGH, July 21, 2016 - Results of a study conducted by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine showed significant improvement in strength and range of motion, as well as evidence for skeletal muscle regeneration, in 13 patients who were surgically implanted with bioscaffolds derived from pig tissue to treat muscle injuries. The patients had failed to respond to conventional tre ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jul 21
Wrist fractures linked to poor balance in elderly patients
Elderly patients suffering a low energy wrist distal radius fracture are more likely to have difficulties with balance, placing them at risk for future injuries, according to a new study appearing in the July 20, 2016 issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery . Wrist fractures constitute one-sixth of all broken bones presented in U.S. emergency departments, and occur in 15 percent of women age 50 and older. The majority of these fractures are the resu ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jul 21
High-fat Mediterranean diet may protect against breast cancer, diabetes and CVE
1. A high-fat Mediterranean diet may protect against breast cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular events Author A healthy diet can include a lot of fat Video Soundbites HD video soundbites of Dr. Hanna Bloomfield discussing the findings are available to download at http www. dssimon. com MM ACP-mediteranian-diet Abstract http www. annals. org article. aspx doi 10. 7326 M16-0361 URL goes live when the embargo lifts According to researchers, a healthy diet ca ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Jul 19
High fat diet improves cartilage repair in mice
Obesity is a well-known risk factor for osteoarthritis, but its effects on cartilage repair are unknown. In a recent study in a mouse model of cartilage repair, a high fat diet and increased body weight did not negatively impair cartilage repair, and it could even accelerate it. The effects of a high fat diet on cartilage repair are most likely related to inflammatory and metabolic changes, but the exact underlying mechanism is not clear. It also remains t ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Jul 19
Defining sarcopenic obesity is key to its effective treatment
Future Science Group FSG today announced the publication of a new article in Future Science OA synthesizing current data on sarcopenic obesity, and looking to highlight the need for public health strategies for prevention and treatment. Sarcopenic obesity is the combination of low muscle mass and high fat mass. Tending to be more common in older adults owing to natural changes associated with aging, sarcopenic obesity has the potential to become of increas ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Jul 15
Scientists trace origin cell of bone and soft tissue tumors, test drug target
DURHAM, N.C. -- Scientists at Duke Health are part of a team that has discovered a type of cell surrounding blood vessels can also serve as a starting point for sarcoma, a form of cancer that occurs in bones and connective tissues. The findings, made through studies of mice, offer insights that could aid in the development of potential new treatments for the rare but devastating cancer, which has 15,000 new diagnoses annually in the U.S. In an article to b ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jul 14