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New evidence may explain sex difference in knee injury rates
In studies on rats, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report new evidence that the predominance of the hormone testosterone in males may explain why women are up to 10 times more likely than men to injure the anterior cruciate ligament ACL in their knees. Specifically, they found that normal male rats with natural supplies of testosterone had stronger ACLs than those that had been castrated and no longer produced the hormone. The results are described onli ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Oct 11
Mobile self-care apps for early identification & treatment of lymphedema
Each year, about 1.38 million women worldwide are diagnosed with breast cancer. Advances in diagnosis and treatment have facilitated a 90 percent, five-year survival rate, among those treated. Given the increased rate and length of survival following breast cancer, more and more survivors are facing a life-time risk of developing breast cancer-related lymphedema one of the most distressing and feared late onset effects. Lymphedema, characterized by the abn ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 7
Chemical exposure linked to lower witamin D levels
Washington, DC--Exposure to bisphenol A BPA and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals EDCs may reduce levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology Metabolism . The study is the first to find an association between EDC exposure and vitamin D levels in a large group of U.S. adults. EDCs are chemicals or mixtures of chemicals that can cause adverse health effects by inte ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 7
Multisensory education enhances patient understanding of orthopaedic conditions
ROSEMONT, Ill. Oct. 5, 2016 -- Patient education involving the use of multiple senses sight, hearing and touch during a physician-patient conversation about treatment, also known as informed consent, improves understanding of anticipated care and possible outcomes, according to a new study appearing in today s issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery JBJS . The field of orthopaedics is primed to take a leadership role in improving physician-patient c ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 7
Prolonged standing at work can cause health problems too
Research on the health risks of prolonged sitting at work have been prominent in the headlines recently. Now, a new study also highlights the hazards of prolonged standing at work.
Medical News Today - Wed. Sep 14
High-frequency spinal cord stimulation 'more effective for chronic pain'
According to a study published in the journal Anesthesiology , a new high-frequency form of spinal cord stimulation therapy has the capacity to deliver more effective pain relief without any unwanted side effects.
Medical News Today - Wed. Sep 14
New target may slow disease progression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a chronic disease causing severe muscle degeneration that is ultimately fatal. As the disease progresses, muscle precursor cells lose the ability to create new musclar tissue, leading to faster muscle deterioration. This month in the JCI , work led by Ming-Jer Tsai at Baylor College of Medicine has identified a protein involved in coordinating the function of muscle precursor cells. The protein, COUP-TFII, may be a promising ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Sep 13
X-rays: The first & best screening tool in diagnosing knee pain among middle-a...
ROSEMONT, Ill. September 9, 2016 --Knee pain is common among Americans age 40 and up. Nearly 1 in 17 people visit doctors offices each year for knee pain or injuries from osteoarthritis--a progressive wear and tear disease of the joints. Those odds increase as the U.S. population continues to age and becomes even more overweight. While a magnetic resonance imaging MRI is one tool that can help doctors diagnose torn knee ligaments and cartilage and other pr ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Sep 9
Prevention programs significantly reduce ankle injuries in soccer athletes
ROSEMONT, Ill. Sept. 7, 2016 -- Prevention programs are effective at reducing the risk of ankle injuries by 40 percent in soccer players, according to a new study appearing in today s issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery JBJS . Injuries to the lower extremities are the most common in soccer. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission CPSC , more than 227,700 people were treated for soccer-related injuries in 2015, including more than 36, ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Sep 8
Extra physical education classes may benefit bone health in girls, study shows
Moderate to high impact sports such as gymnastics, basketball, or football have been shown to benefit bone mass, structure and strength - with benefits particularly apparent during pre-and early adolescence. A long-term study carried out in four Swedish schools evaluated whether extra physical education classes would have an impact on bone parameters in growing children. The seven-year study specifically measured the impact of school-based exercise on tibi ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Sep 7
Antidepressant bone loss could be prevented with beta-blockers
The antidepressant fluoxetine causes bone loss by instructing the brain to send out signals that increase bone breakdown, but a beta-blocker can intercept the signals, a new study in mice has found. The study was published Sept. 5 in Nature Medicine . The use of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors SSRIs , a class of drugs broadly prescribed for mood disorders as well as for nonpsychiatric conditions, previously has been associated with an increased ris ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Sep 7
Why bones don't heal: Researchers identify risk factors for nonunion of fractu...
New Orleans, LA - Dr. Robert Zura, the Robert D Ambrosia Professor and Head of Orthopaedic Surgery at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, was part of a research team that identified risk factors which may help orthopaedic surgeons better predict a serious complication of bone fractures. Fracture nonunion may be increasing as more patients survive serious fractures. The paper was published September 7, 2016, in the Online First section of JAMA Surger ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Sep 7