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Radiological prediction of posttraumatic kyphosis after thoracolumbar fracture
There is still no consensus on the treatment of traumatic thoracolumbar fractures, therefore more evidence is needed. As surgeons base treatment decisions on classification of the fractures, much attention has been given to classification schemes for fractures around the world. However, it is remarkable that none of the classification methods has paid attention to the kyphosis. This seems to be of importance, because post-traumatic kyphosis is related to p ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jun 20
Exercise may be the simple solution for rescuing seniors' lost and injured mus...
Exercise may have some surprising benefits for seniors who experience rapid muscle loss and muscle injury and loss as they age. Researchers at McMaster University have found that physical activity can help retain, even repair and regenerate damaged muscle in the elderly. The findings challenge what is generally seen as an inevitable fact of life that muscle atrophy and damage cannot be completely repaired in old age and in some cases lost altogether. Resea ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jun 20
Exercise may have therapeutic potential for expediting muscle repair in older ...
Here s another reason why you should hit the gym regularly as you grow older A new report appearing online in The FASEB Journal shows that regular exercise plays a critical role in helping muscles repair themselves as quickly as possible after injury. For many mammals, including humans, the speed of muscle repair slows as they grow older, and it was once thought that complete repair could not be achieved after a certain age. This report shows, however, tha ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Jun 17
Face of the future
New York, NY--June 15, 2016--A new technique developed by Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, the Mikati Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Columbia Engineering and professor of medical sciences in Medicine at Columbia University, repairs large bone defects in the head and face by using lab-grown living bone, tailored to the patient and the defect being treated. This is the first time researchers have grown living bone that precisely replicates the or ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jun 16
Disjointed: Cell differences may explain why rheumatoid arthritis varies by lo...
Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Pennsylvania and China, report that not only are there distinct differences in key cellular processes and molecular signatures between rheumatoid arthritis RA and osteoarthritis OA but, more surprisingly, there are joint-specific differences in RA. The findings help explain, in part, why drugs treating RA vary in effect -- why, for example, a treatment that might w ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Jun 10
World's first child-exoskeleton for spinal muscular atrophy
Furthermore, it will also be used in physiotherapy in hospitals to prevent the secondary effects associated with the loss of mobility in this illness. The technology, which has been patented and licensed jointly by CSIC the Spanish National Research Council and its technology-based business unit, Marsi Bionics, is currently in the preclinical phase. The brace consists of long support rods, or orthoses, which are adjusted to fit around the child s legs and ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Jun 8
Study finds opposing trends in hospitalizations, costs for gout and rheumatoid...
While hospitalizations related to rheumatoid arthritis have dropped considerably over the past two decades, hospitalizations primarily associated with gout have increased dramatically. These results of a study described in a research letter in the June 7, 2016 issue of JAMA reflect improved management of rheumatoid arthritis patients and both an increased prevalence and persistent suboptimal care of gout. Our findings provide a remarkably encouraging bench ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Jun 7
Study questions cancer link with bone growth factor for spinal surgery
June 7, 2016 - Adding to previous evidence, a study based on a statewide cancer database shows no increase in cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with the bone-promoting growth factor recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein rhBMP . The study appears in Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer. At least through the first several years, patients who receiving rhBMP during spinal fusion surgery are at no higher risk of cancer than those un ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Jun 7
Study finds minimal risk for serious infection with 'in bone' prosthesis
A new study in today s issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery found minimal risk for severe infection with osseointegrated implants--a newer prosthetic system, press-fitted directly into the femur bone--that enables bone growth over a metal, robotic prosthetic limb in patients with above knee amputations. For more than 600 years, patients with amputations above the knee received a prosthesis that fit over the skin and soft tissue of the amputation ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jun 2
Deployed US military service members more likely to suffer noncombat bone and ...
ROSEMONT, Ill. June 1, 2016 --Since September 11, 2001, an estimated 60,000 U.S. military service members have been injured in combat during the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Nearly 45,000 75 percent of all combat injuries are caused by improvised explosive devices, also known as IEDs. Approximately two out of five service members with combat injuries 40 percent have suffered fractures, traumatic amputations, and injuries to the spine. Many of these injuries ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jun 2
Cell insights shed light on how muscle-wasting disease takes hold
Fresh insights into how our cells control muscle development could aid understanding of muscular dystrophy and other inherited diseases. Scientists have discovered a way in which proteins in our cells help to control genes in our DNA, which are involved in forming muscle. Their finding explains an apparent paradox in which proteins linked to a series of genetic diseases can be found in cells throughout the body, but impact only on some tissue types. Resear ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jun 2
Scientists discover and test new class of pain relievers
DURHAM, N.C. -- A research team at Duke University has discovered a potential new class of small-molecule drugs that simultaneously block two sought-after targets in the treatment of pain. These proof-of-concept experiments, published June 1 in Scientific Reports , could lead to the development of a new drug to treat conditions including skin irritation and itching, headaches, jaw pain, and abdominal pain stemming from the pancreas and colon. More than 100 ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Jun 1