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Back pain may raise risk of mental health problems
A study, involving almost 200,000 participants, finds that individuals who have back pain are more likely to also experience a range of mental health issues. Knowing about these links could form a more successful treatment plan for both sets of conditions.
Medical News Today - Wed. Dec 14
Broken shoulder leads to carpal tunnel syndrome surgery study
Patients who undergo surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome can regain their typing ability within two or three weeks after the operation. That is the conclusion of a serendipitous research project that came about because a psychologist who studies the automatic response patterns involved in typing broke his shoulder. In 2009, Gordon Logan, Centennial Professor of Psychology at Vanderbilt University, put a stool on top of a chair to change a light bulb. The ar ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Dec 13
AAOS Board approves treatment criteria for carpal tunnel syndrome and knee ost...
Rosemont, Ill. --The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons AAOS Board of Directors has approved new Appropriate Use Criteria AUC for the management of carpal tunnel syndrome CTS and the surgical management of osteoarthritis of the knee. The AUCs provide specific diagnostic criteria, complementing and building upon the clinical practice guidelines CPGs Management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Surgical Management of Osteoarthritis of the Knee. The CPGs an ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Dec 12
Key regulator of bone development identified
Loss of a key protein leads to defects in skeletal development including reduced bone density and a shortening of the fingers and toes -- a condition known as brachydactyly. The discovery was made by researchers at Penn State University who knocked out the Speckle-type POZ Protein Spop in the mouse and characterized the impact on bone development. The research, which appears online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on December ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Dec 9
Study: Running actually lowers inflammation in knee joints
We all know that running causes a bit of inflammation and soreness, and that s just the price you pay for cardiovascular health. You know no pain, no gain. Well, maybe not. New research from BYU exercise science professors finds that pro-inflammatory molecules actually go down in the knee joint after running. In other words, it appears running can reduce joint inflammation. It flies in the face of intuition, said study coauthor Matt Seeley, associate profe ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Dec 9
New gene therapy for pseudarthrosis trialed at Kazan University
A team headed by Professor Albert Rizvanov, director of the Gene and Cell Technologies Open Lab, created a gene therapy drug that encodes growth factors for the stimulation of blood vessel and bone formation. The combination was highly effective in a patient admitted to the Republican Clinical Hospital in Kazan, Russia. The treatment was approved by the ethical committee, supported by the Ministry of Healthcare of Tatarstan and published in BioNanoScience ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Dec 2
XROMM, an influential 3-D, X-ray technology for biomechanics, gains new capabi...
PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- It s right there in the word discovery -- the idea of removing whatever cover may obscure a particular phenomenon from observation. And that s exactly what Brown University s X-ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology technology does to reveal the inner workings of people and animals. With two recent papers describing powerful new software and a way to track muscle contractions, XROMM can do even more than before. And ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Dec 1
NEOMED researchers identify link between brain and bone in Alzheimer's disease
ROOTSTOWN, OH--Researchers at NEOMED have just identified a major connection between areas of the brainstem - the ancient area that controls mood, sleep and metabolism - and detrimental changes to bone in a preclinical model of Alzheimer s disease AD . The study, titled Early Evidence of Low Bone Density and Decreased Serotonergic Synthesis in the Dorsal Raphe of a Tauopathy Model of Alzheimer s Disease, is led by Christine Dengler-Crish, Ph.D., assistant ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Dec 1
Could ambulatory surgical centers help bend the cost curve in US health care?
ROSEMONT, Ill. December 1, 2016 --U.S. healthcare costs have more than tripled since the 1960s1. Nearly one of every five dollars of national expenses1,2 are spent on health care. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ACA --signed into law in 2010--aims to decrease healthcare delivery costs, improve quality and value of care, and improve population health. New research, published in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons JAAOS ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Dec 1
Hyperuricemia is associated with musculoskeletal pain
Episodes of diffuse musculo-skeletal pain appearing in and around a joint region without a clear diagnosis, etiology and therapy are still a major problem in general medical practice. Our cross-sectional study addresses the question of whether slightly elevated urate levels are associated with musculo-skeletal pain. While the usefulness of urate-lowering treatment in patients with clinical manifestations of hyperuricemia has been established, its use in as ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Nov 28
Fibroblasts could provide new target for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis
A study led by researchers at the University of Birmingham reveals the key role of different types of fibroblast cells in the development of rheumatoid arthritis RA , opening up a new avenue for research into treatment of the disease. Synovial Fibroblasts SFs are cells that make up part of the connective tissue, or synovium, around human joints. In RA patients, SF cells cause damage by invading and attacking the cartilage and bone around the joint. A team ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Nov 23
'Minimal' shoes may reduce running injuries
Runners who wear trainers with no cushioning and land on the ball of their foot rather than the heel put significantly less demand on their bodies, new research suggests. Researchers compared how quickly the force acts when runners feet hit the ground -- known as the loading rate -- which has been shown to influence running injury risk. The study of 29 runners found significantly lower loading rates for those who wore so-called minimal trainers and landed ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Nov 21