fb_thumb
Children with swollen, painful knees: Is it Lyme disease or septic arthritis?
Septic or infectious arthritis of the knee and Lyme disease have similar symptoms in children but require different immediate treatment to ensure optimal recovery. A new study in the May 4 issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery identifies four symptoms that are predictive of septic arthritis when the condition presents itself in a child s knee--an important distinction in areas where Lyme disease is prevalent. Septic arthritis is considered a medic ...
EurekAlert - Thu. May 12
Patients may not need to wait 2 weeks to shower following knee replacement sur...
MAYWOOD, IL - A Loyola Medicine study suggests it may not be necessary for knee replacement patients to wait up to two weeks after surgery before showering, as many surgeons now require. The study compared patients who were allowed to shower two days after surgery with patients who had to wait 10 to 14 days. Researchers performed bacterial culture swabs of skin next to incisions, and no differences were found between the early-shower and delayed-shower gro ...
EurekAlert - Thu. May 12
Risks of heart attack, stroke may outweigh benefits of calcium supplement
With the highest reported risk of hip fractures in the word, Norway has good reason to consider the benefits and risks of calcium supplements. The challenge is that too little calcium and vitamin D in your diet leads to an increased risk of osteoporosis and broken bones, which taking supplements has been shown to help prevent. However, some studies have also shown that taking supplemental calcium may also increase your risk of heart attack and stroke. We c ...
EurekAlert - Thu. May 12
Cancer may drive health problems as people age
A new study indicates that cancer may have negative impacts on both the physical and mental health of individuals as they age. Published early online in CANCER , a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study suggests that cancer increases the risk for certain health issues above and beyond normal aging. This is likely due, in part, to decreased physical activity and stress associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment. As the populatio ...
EurekAlert - Mon. May 9
Study of elite paralympic athletes supports benefits of exercise for children ...
May 6, 2016 - For highly trained Paralympic athletes with cerebral palsy CP , bone mineral density and other measures of body composition are similar to those of able-bodied adults of similar age, reports a study in the American Journal of Physical Medicine Rehabilitation , the official journal of the Association of Academic Physiatrists . The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer . While elite-level athletes with hemiplegic CP still have reduced muscle m ...
EurekAlert - Sat. May 7
Experts decipher the disease behind one of the world's most famous paintings
It is one of the most famous paintings in American history Christina s World, by Andrew Wyeth. The painting, which hangs in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, depicts a young woman in a field, gazing at a farmhouse on an idyllic summer day. But this lovely image has a dark side. The subject in the painting is Christina Olson, Wyeth s good friend and neighbor. For most of her life, she suffered from a mysterious disorder, which slowly took away her abili ...
EurekAlert - Fri. May 6
Newspapers often publish false depictions of gout
A new analysis reveals that popular newspaper articles depict gout as a self-inflicted condition that is socially embarrassing and the focus of humor. Specifically, social embarrassment due to gout was reported in 27 of 114 23.7 articles in the 21 highest circulation newspapers in the United Kingdom and United States between 2010 and 2015. Jokes or humorous references to gout were reported in 30 of the 114 articles 26.3 . In addition, dietary solutions wer ...
EurekAlert - Wed. May 4
Placenta size and offspring bone development linked
Researchers at the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, studied 518 children in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children ALSPAC who underwent bone scans at nine, 15 and 17 years old. Measurements such as thickness, volume and weight, were also taken from the mothers placenta. The Southampton group, working with colleagues at the University of Bristol, found that greater placental size at birth was ass ...
EurekAlert - Tue. May 3
Ultrasound-estimated fat content in muscles may be an indicator of physical he...
Ultrasound-estimated percent intramuscular fat of muscles in the lower extremity was inversely associated with physical activity level and positively associated with body mass index in a recent study. Ultrasound is advantageous because it is less costly and more accessible when compared with other imaging technologies. The Muscle Nerve study included 42 participants 16 men, 26 women between the ages of 19 and 68 years, with a wide range of body mass index ...
EurekAlert - Tue. May 3
Less body fat for toddlers taking vitamin D
A healthy intake of vitamin D in the first year of life appears to set children up to have more muscle mass and less body fat as toddlers, according to a new study published in the journal Pediatric Obesity . The findings emerged from research initially aimed at confirming the importance of vitamin D for bone density. The additional benefit in terms of body composition came as a surprise for the research team. We were very intrigued by the higher lean mass ...
EurekAlert - Mon. May 2
Quieting cells' low-oxygen alarm stops flare-ups in rare bone disorder
PHILADELPHIA - The cellular response to the lack of oxygen fans the flames of flare-ups in a rare bone disorder. In fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva FOP , a mutation triggers bone growth in muscles, which limits motion, breathing, and swallowing, among a host of progressive symptoms. Scientists from the Center for Research in FOP and Related Disorders at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and colleagues examined the crit ...
EurekAlert - Mon. May 2
New literature review assesses benefits of stem cells for treating spinal cord...
ROSEMONT, Ill. April 29, 2016 --Stem cell therapy is a rapidly evolving and promising treatment for spinal-cord injuries. According to a new literature review, published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons JAAOS , different types of stem cells vary in their ability to help restore function, and an ideal treatment protocol remains unclear pending further clinical research. Approximately 230,000 Americans suffer l ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Apr 29