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Deployed US military service members more likely to suffer noncombat bone and ...
ROSEMONT, Ill. June 1, 2016 --Since September 11, 2001, an estimated 60,000 U.S. military service members have been injured in combat during the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Nearly 45,000 75 percent of all combat injuries are caused by improvised explosive devices, also known as IEDs. Approximately two out of five service members with combat injuries 40 percent have suffered fractures, traumatic amputations, and injuries to the spine. Many of these injuries ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jun 2
Cell insights shed light on how muscle-wasting disease takes hold
Fresh insights into how our cells control muscle development could aid understanding of muscular dystrophy and other inherited diseases. Scientists have discovered a way in which proteins in our cells help to control genes in our DNA, which are involved in forming muscle. Their finding explains an apparent paradox in which proteins linked to a series of genetic diseases can be found in cells throughout the body, but impact only on some tissue types. Resear ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Jun 2
Scientists discover and test new class of pain relievers
DURHAM, N.C. -- A research team at Duke University has discovered a potential new class of small-molecule drugs that simultaneously block two sought-after targets in the treatment of pain. These proof-of-concept experiments, published June 1 in Scientific Reports , could lead to the development of a new drug to treat conditions including skin irritation and itching, headaches, jaw pain, and abdominal pain stemming from the pancreas and colon. More than 100 ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Jun 1
New muscular dystrophy drug target identified
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have discovered that muscle cells affected by muscular dystrophy contain high levels of an enzyme that impairs muscle repair. This finding provides a new target for potential drug treatments for the disease, which currently has no cure. Muscular dystrophy MD is an inherited genetic condition that gradually causes a weakening of muscles. Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD is the most common, and one of the most severe ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Jun 1
Premature babies may grow up to have weaker bones
Among the many important processes that happen during a woman s last few weeks of pregnancy is the transfer of calcium to the growing foetus to boost bone development. But what happens if this transfer is interrupted when a baby is born prematurely The answer, it seems, is lower peak bone mass as an adult, compared to adults who were born full term. Adults who were born full term but were small for their gestational age also had lower bone mass. These find ...
EurekAlert - Tue. May 31
Cells engineered from muscular dystrophy patients offer clues to variations in...
Johns Hopkins researchers report they have inadvertently found a way to make human muscle cells bearing genetic mutations from people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD . A report on the feat, published online in the journal Cell Reports on May 26, should shed light on how subtle genetic differences among DMD patients produce symptoms with a wide range of severity and disability. The cells, they say, could also be used to test new therapies. The serendip ...
EurekAlert - Thu. May 26
Couples study ties anger to heart problems, stonewalling to back pain
If you rage with frustration during a marital spat, watch your blood pressure. If you keep a stiff upper lip, watch your back. New research from the University of California, Berkeley, and Northwestern University, based on how couples behave during conflicts, suggests outbursts of anger predict cardiovascular problem. Conversely, shutting down emotionally or stonewalling during conflict raises the risk of musculoskeletal ailments such as a bad back or stif ...
EurekAlert - Tue. May 24
New research could personalize medicine for arthritis patients
Joint injury can lead to post-traumatic osteoarthritis PTOA . In fact, about half of all people who rupture the anterior cruciate ligament ACL in their knee will develop PTOA within 10-20 years of the injury. But the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to cartilage degeneration or PTOA due to trauma are not well understood. Recently, a team of scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL , University of California, Davis, University of ...
EurekAlert - Fri. May 20
TXA administered intravenously and by injection reduces blood loss after knee ...
A new study appearing in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery found that administering tranexamic acid TXA both intravenously IV and injected at the surgical site intra-articular administration, or IA reduced blood loss by 37 percent, compared to IV alone, following total knee replacement TKR . Administering TXA through IV or IA has been shown to reduce blood loss in several studies however, researchers had yet to investigate the impact of combining the d ...
EurekAlert - Fri. May 20
Use of arthroscopic hip surgery way up, but patient selection important for go...
For patients with serious, ongoing hip pain, sometimes surgery is their best bet for relief. Given the choice between minimally invasive hip surgery and total hip replacement, most patients would choose the less invasive procedure, often done on an outpatient basis. But a study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery HSS in New York City finds that arthroscopic surgery may not be the best option, especially if a patient is over 60 or has arthritis. ...
EurekAlert - Thu. May 19
Survey: 71 percent of hip fracture patients not told they have osteoporosis
Great Neck, NY - More than 7 in 10 older adults who suffer hip fractures aren t told they have the bone-weakening disease osteoporosis - despite the fact that hip fractures nearly always signify the presence of this potentially debilitating condition, according to revealing new research by Northwell Health physicians. Geriatric fellow Mia Barnett, MD, led a telephone survey of 42 hip fracture patients ages 65 and older that showed a startling level of misi ...
EurekAlert - Thu. May 19
Holidays in the sun hold key to boosting vitamin D, study finds
Holidays abroad may hold the key to tackling Scotland s vitamin D deficiency, research suggests. People who take foreign breaks have higher levels of vitamin D in their blood, which has been linked to wide-ranging health benefits, a study has found. Farmers also have higher levels of the vitamin -- which is produced in the skin after exposure to sunlight -- according to the findings. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh surveyed the vitamin D levels ...
EurekAlert - Wed. May 18