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High cholesterol levels linked with rotator cuff surgery failure
Patients with higher cholesterol levels face a significantly greater risk for failure of minimally invasive arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery, according to a new study to be presented on Friday, March 17, at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons AAOS . According to the study, commonly-used cholesterol lowering drugs, called statins, diminish this risk. The study found an association between the use of statin lipid lowering ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Mar 14
Home may be the best place to recover after total joint replacement surgery
Despite higher costs, many doctors recommend and some patients prefer, recovery at an in-patient rehabilitation facility following total hip THR or total knee replacement TKR surgery. And yet a new study to be presented Thursday, March 16, at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons AAOS , found that even patients who live alone can recover effectively and safely at home. In the past, most surgeons have been reticent to disch ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Mar 14
Less than half of elderly hip fracture patients take vitamin D supplements
Despite national recommendations for daily vitamin D intake, a new study presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons AAOS found that just 45.7 percent of patients reported consistently taking vitamin D supplements following a hip fracture, a known treatment and preventative strategy for osteoporosis. In the U.S., an estimated 44 million people have osteoporosis and another 10 million are at risk for the diseas ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Mar 14
Keeping pitchers in the game: Potential in osteopathic medicine to prevent sho...
CHICAGO--March 13, 2017. The Spencer technique, in which a clinician guides the shoulder joint through its full range of motion ROM , may prevent injury in baseball pitchers, according to research in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association . Researchers evaluated the effects of the Spencer technique on pitchers from Seton Hill University s men s baseball team. They found a single administration of the technique immediately restored internal rot ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Mar 13
Pelvic fractures may increase older adults' risk of dying early
Adults older than 60 years face an increased risk of dying in the first 8 months following a pelvic fracture, new research indicates. In the first 4 weeks after fracture, individuals age 60 years and older faced a 3-times higher risk of death, after adjusting for confounding factors. Their elevated risk decreased over subsequent weeks but was still significant up to week 32. The results, which come from a large population-based study in Germany, emphasize ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Mar 9
How exercise -- interval training in particular -- helps your mitochondria sta...
It s oft-repeated but true exercise keeps you healthy. It boosts your immune system, keeps the mind sharp, helps you sleep, maintains your muscle tone, and extends your healthy lifespan. Researchers have long suspected that the benefits of exercise extend down to the cellular level, but know relatively little about which exercises help cells rebuild key organelles that deteriorate with aging. A study published March 7 in Cell Metabolism found that exercise ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Mar 7
Can combined exercise and nutritional intervention improve muscle mass and fun...
Although progressive muscle loss is a natural part of ageing, sarcopenia is generally identified when muscle mass and muscle function falls below defined thresholds. Sarcopenia s impact can be enormous as it affects mobility, balance, risk of falls and fractures, and overall ability to perform tasks of daily living. Given the ageing of populations worldwide, public health and clinical recommendations to prevent and manage sarcopenia are urgently needed. Th ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Mar 7
Study finds knee surgery holds even in heavier patients
Meniscal repairs are one of the most common orthopedic surgeries in the U.S., but about 15 percent of them fail, requiring the patient to undergo a second surgery. Many have assumed that an increased body mass index BMI is a good predictor of whether a meniscal repair will fail, since more weight translates to more pressure on the knee joint. However, a new study from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows that BMI has no effect on whether o ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Mar 6
Scientists discover new mechanism that leads to inflammation in rheumatoid art...
New research findings published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology , suggest that synovial CD4 T cells that produce IL-21 contribute to joint inflammation by activating synovial fibroblasts in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Understanding the mechanisms of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis is important for the design of new therapies for this disease. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis with active disease inflamed joints have difficulty for instance in ...
EurekAlert - Sun. Mar 5
Physical therapy proves as effective as surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome
Physical therapy is as effective as surgery in treating carpal tunnel syndrome, according to a new study published in the March 2017 issue of the Journal of Orthopaedic Sports Physical Therapy reg JOSPT reg . Researchers in Spain and the United States report that one year following treatment, patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who received physical therapy achieved results comparable to outcomes for patients who had surgery for this condition. Further, p ...
EurekAlert - Sun. Mar 5
Horseback riding interventions have therapeutic benefits for people with disab...
March 2, 2017 - Physical activities incorporating horseback riding can help to improve strength, balance, and other outcomes for children and adults with a range of neuromotor, developmental, and physical disabilities, according to a report in the American Journal of Physical Medicine Rehabilitation , the official journal of the Association of Academic Physiatrists . The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer . Such equine-assisted activities and therapies ...
EurekAlert - Sun. Mar 5
Is back pain killing us?
The 600,000 older Australians who suffer from back pain have a 13 per cent increased risk of dying from any cause, University of Sydney research has found. Published in the European Journal of Pain , the study of 4390 Danish twins aged more than 70 years investigated whether spinal pain increased the rate of all-cause and disease-specific cardiovascular mortality. Low back pain is a major problem, ranked as the highest contributor to disability in the worl ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Feb 23