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Rat study provides insights on tendon overuse injuries
In research conducted in rats, investigators have shown for the first time the effect of rotator cuff tendon overuse, or tendinopathy, on surrounding tissues. Such overuse is among the major causes of shoulder pain and discomfort in athletes, laborers, older adults, and those who use a repetitive overhead motion in daily activities. Untreated tendinopathy can lead to full or partial rotator cuff tendon rupture, requiring orthopaedic surgery and a potential ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Dec 21
Gelatin supplements, good for your joints?
A new study from Keith Baar s Functional Molecular Biology Laboratory at the UC Davis College of Biological Sciences and the Australian Institute of Sport suggests that consuming a gelatin supplement, plus a burst of intensive exercise, can help build ligaments, tendons and bones. The study is published in the January issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition . Connective tissue and bone injuries are common in both athletes and the elderly, and i ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Dec 20
Remarkable recovery in patients diagnosed with newly defined movement disorder
DNA sequencing has defined a new genetic disorder that affects movement, enabling patients with dystonia -- a disabling condition that affects voluntary movement -- to be targeted for treatment that brings remarkable improvements, including restoring independent walking. A team of researchers from UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University of Cambridge and the NIHR Rare Disease Bioresource have identified mutations in a gene, called KMT2 ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Dec 19
Exploring future preventive strategies for patients at imminent risk of hip fr...
Hip fractures are of great concern as they are the most severe type of fracture in osteoporotic patients, associated with premature death, and commonly leading to long-term physical disability, impaired capacity to perform daily activities and live independently, and reduced quality of life. In the Western world, the lifetime risk for hip fracture in women over the age of 50 years is 18-23 and by 2050, the worldwide annual number of hip fractures is expect ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Dec 19
Stem cell 'living bandage' for knee injuries trialed in humans
A living bandage made from stem cells, which could revolutionise the treatment and prognosis of a common sporting knee injury, has been trialled in humans for the first time by scientists at the Universities of Liverpool and Bristol. Meniscal tears are suffered by over one million people a year in the US and Europe alone and are particularly common in contact sports like football and rugby. 90 or more of tears occur in the white zone of meniscus which lack ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Dec 16
Researchers add to evidence that common bacterial cause of gum disease may dri...
Investigators at Johns Hopkins report they have new evidence that a bacterium known to cause chronic inflammatory gum infections also triggers the inflammatory autoimmune response characteristic of chronic, joint-destroying rheumatoid arthritis RA . The new findings have important implications for prevention and treatment of RA, say the researchers. In a report on the work, published in the Dec. 14 edition of the journal Science Translational Medicine , th ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Dec 14
Creative approach to probing genome IDs genes that likely influence bone stren...
In an important step in the battle against osteoporosis, a serious brittle bone disease that affects millions, researchers have identified more than a dozen genes amid the vast human genome likely responsible for bone density and strength. The crafty approach the researchers used to find these genes - essentially identifying needles in a haystack - could speed the development of new and better treatments for osteoporosis and many other diseases. Narrowing ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Dec 14
Back pain may raise risk of mental health problems
A study, involving almost 200,000 participants, finds that individuals who have back pain are more likely to also experience a range of mental health issues. Knowing about these links could form a more successful treatment plan for both sets of conditions.
Medical News Today - Wed. Dec 14
Broken shoulder leads to carpal tunnel syndrome surgery study
Patients who undergo surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome can regain their typing ability within two or three weeks after the operation. That is the conclusion of a serendipitous research project that came about because a psychologist who studies the automatic response patterns involved in typing broke his shoulder. In 2009, Gordon Logan, Centennial Professor of Psychology at Vanderbilt University, put a stool on top of a chair to change a light bulb. The ar ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Dec 13
AAOS Board approves treatment criteria for carpal tunnel syndrome and knee ost...
Rosemont, Ill. --The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons AAOS Board of Directors has approved new Appropriate Use Criteria AUC for the management of carpal tunnel syndrome CTS and the surgical management of osteoarthritis of the knee. The AUCs provide specific diagnostic criteria, complementing and building upon the clinical practice guidelines CPGs Management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Surgical Management of Osteoarthritis of the Knee. The CPGs an ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Dec 12
Key regulator of bone development identified
Loss of a key protein leads to defects in skeletal development including reduced bone density and a shortening of the fingers and toes -- a condition known as brachydactyly. The discovery was made by researchers at Penn State University who knocked out the Speckle-type POZ Protein Spop in the mouse and characterized the impact on bone development. The research, which appears online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on December ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Dec 9
Study: Running actually lowers inflammation in knee joints
We all know that running causes a bit of inflammation and soreness, and that s just the price you pay for cardiovascular health. You know no pain, no gain. Well, maybe not. New research from BYU exercise science professors finds that pro-inflammatory molecules actually go down in the knee joint after running. In other words, it appears running can reduce joint inflammation. It flies in the face of intuition, said study coauthor Matt Seeley, associate profe ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Dec 9