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American College of Physicians issues guideline for treating nonradicular low ...
Philadelphia, February 14, 2017 -- The American College of Physicians ACP recommends in an evidence-based clinical practice guideline published today in Annals of Internal Medicine that physicians and patients should treat acute or subacute low back pain with non-drug therapies such as superficial heat, massage, acupuncture, or spinal manipulation. If drug therapy is desired, physicians and patients should select nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs NSAIDs ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Feb 15
Mind the (osteoporosis treatment) gap!
With the first of the baby boomer generation now entering their eighties, the next decade will see a significant increase in the number of people living with osteoporosis and experiencing the often devastating outcome of fragility fractures. A newly published narrative review in Osteoporosis International considers the key global challenges facing healthcare professionals and policymakers responsible for providing care to populations in relation to bone he ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Feb 15
Insurance status impacts complication rates after shoulder replacement surgery
Boston -- Patients undergoing shoulder replacement surgery who have Medicaid, Medicare or no health insurance, had higher complication rates as compared to patients who had private insurance. The findings, which appear in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery , demonstrate disparities in acute postoperative outcomes for shoulder replacement surgery based on insurance status. Shoulder replacements arthroplasties are recommended for patients suffering fr ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Feb 13
GW researcher finds genetic cause of new type of muscular dystrophy
WASHINGTON Feb. 9, 2017 -- A newly discovered mutation in the INPP5K gene , which leads to short stature, muscle weakness, intellectual disability, and cataracts, suggests a new type of congenital muscular dystrophy. The research was published in the American Journal of Human Genetics by researchers from the George Washington University GW , St. George s University of London, and other institutions. The average pediatrician may only see one child with a ra ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Feb 9
Poor thigh muscle strength may increase women's risk of knee osteoarthritis
A new study has found that poor strength in the thigh muscles may increase the risk of knee osteoarthritis in women but not men. This relationship was confounded by body mass index BMI , which itself is known as a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis. The study s investigators noted that there may be more contractile tissue and strength present in men with greater BMI and more non-contractile fat tissue in women with greater BMI. The sex-specific relationsh ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Feb 8
New study finds that yoga can be helpful for low back pain
Over the course of their lives, about 80 percent of Americans will suffer from back pain at one time or another. A recent study found that more than a third of adults say that low back pain has affected their ability to perform the tasks of daily living, exercise, or sleep. Treating this pain remains a difficult problem, and for millions of people the pain is chronic. Now, a new study by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine UM SOM ha ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Feb 7
Is the pain coming from your hip, spine or both?
ROSEMONT, Ill. Feb.6, 2017 -- Many patients live with low back pain that radiates to the buttock, groin, thigh, and even knees. The challenge for patients, and often their doctors, is determining the origin of the pain -- the hip, the spine, or both. A new article published in the February Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons JAAOS outlines the identical symptoms associated with hip and spine pain and discusses the diagnostic steps and t ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Feb 6
New genes for height revealed in global study of 700,000 people
83 new genetic variants that strongly influence human height have been discovered in a study led by Queen Mary University of London QMUL , Montreal Heart Institute, The Broad Institute and the University of Exeter. The research, which is published in Nature , is the largest genetic study of adult height to date, with the international team of researchers analysing DNA from over 700,000 participants across the globe to determine why people have different he ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Feb 3
The drugs don't work, say back pain researchers
Commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, used to treat back pain provide little benefit, but cause side effects, according to new research from The George Institute for Global Health. The findings of the systematic review, published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases , reveal only one in six patients treated with the pills, also known as NSAIDs, achieve any significant reduction in pain. The study is the latest work from ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Feb 3
New skin-graft system a better fix for chronic wounds
According to the National Institutes of Health, more than six million cases of chronic wounds cost 20 billion each year in the United States. Diabetic ulcers, pressure sores, surgical site wounds and traumatic injuries to high-risk patients account for most wounds that won t heal. However, data from a University of Missouri School of Medicine study indicates that a recently developed skin-graft harvesting system aids in chronic wound recovery and reduces c ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Feb 3
Gene therapy for Pompe disease effective in mice, poised for human trials
DURHAM, N.C. -- After decades investigating a rare, life-threatening condition that cripples the muscles, Duke Health researchers have developed a gene therapy they hope could enhance or even replace the only FDA-approved treatment currently available to patients. The gene therapy, demonstrated in mice, is described in a new study published online in the journal Molecular Therapy - Methods Clinical Development . The therapy uses a modified virus to deliver ...
EurekAlert - Sat. Jan 28
Anti-inflammatory diet could reduce risk of bone loss in women
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Anti-inflammatory diets -- which tend to be high in vegetables, fruits, fish and whole grains -- could boost bone health and prevent fractures in some women, a new study suggests. Researchers examined data from the landmark Women s Health Initiative to compare levels of inflammatory elements in the diet to bone mineral density and fractures and found new associations between food and bone health. The study, led by Tonya Orchard, an assista ...
EurekAlert - Sat. Jan 28