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Yoga, Stretching Classes Outdo Self-Care for Back Pain: Study
Yoga instruction and conventional stretching classes are equally good at relieving discomfort from chronic moderate lower-back pain, new research suggests. Both are also better than trying to manage pain on your own by following the exercise, lifestyle and flare-up advice provided in self-help books, the study found. For a person with garden-variety back pain who is willing to move their body, the bottom-line is that a beginner s yoga class geared for back ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Many Health-Care Workers Have Turned to Alternative Medicine
Three out of every four U.S. health-care workers use some form of complementary or alternative medicine or practice to help stay healthy, a new report shows. What s more, doctors, nurses and their assistants, health technicians, and healthcare administrators were actually more likely than the general public to use any number of wide-ranging alternative medicine options, including massage, yoga, acupuncture, Pilates or herbal medicines. No one has really do ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Americans Spend Billions on Alternative Medicine
Americans spent 33.9 billion out-of-pocket on complementary and alternative medicine in 2007 alone, U.S. health officials report. CAM includes medical practices and products, such as herbal supplements, meditation, chiropractic and acupuncture, which are not part of conventional medicine. The bottom line is that Americans spend a lot of money on CAM products, classes or materials or practitioner visits, Dr. Josephine P. Briggs, director of the U.S. Nationa ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Science Reveals How Owls Avoid Stroke While Rotating Heads
What a hoot Scientists say they ve discovered how owls can almost fully rotate their heads without damaging the blood vessels in their necks or cutting off the blood supply to their brains. Owls have four major bone structure and blood vessel adaptations that prevent injury when they rotate their head. Humans lack these adaptations, which helps explain why people are more vulnerable to neck injuries, according to the Johns Hopkins researchers. Until now, b ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Talk to Your Doc About Your Alternative Meds
The popularity of complementary and alternative medicine is on the rise, with more than one-third of U.S. adults using at least one these treatments, according to a recent report by the Institute of Medicine. And if you re like most proponents of these treatments, you probably don t mention them to your primary-care physician. You may think it s not important or you might just forget. Or, you might think your doctor won t approve. But it s crucial to tell ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Soaring U.S. Spinal Care Spending Due to Specialists: Study
Care provided by medical specialists is the main reason spending on treatment for back and neck problems in the United States has nearly doubled since the late 1990s, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed data on how much Americans spent on ambulatory non-hospital care for back and neck problems from 1999 to 2008. The study was published Sept. 1 in the journal Spine . In 2008, about 6 percent of adults made an ambulatory care visit for diagnosis o ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Although the proper exercise can help people deal with and alleviate chronic neck and back pain, a new study shows that health professionals may not be prescribing it as often as they should. Less than half of the nearly 700 people surveyed -- all of whom had seen a physician, chiropractor or physical therapist in the past year for chronic back or neck pain -- were prescribed exercise, the study found. The results, based on a telephone survey by researcher ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Combining Mainstream, Alternative Therapies Brings Back Pain Relief
Used together, conventional and complementary alternative treatments help patients ease their low back pain better than using mainstream treatment alone, U.S. research shows. The small study included 13 patients who received integrated care and six patients who received usual care. The integrative care team at Brigham and Women s Hospital in Boston included experts in acupuncture, chiropractic, internal medicine, massage therapy, neurology, nursing, nutrit ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Spinal Manipulation, Home Exercise May Ease Neck Pain
Spinal manipulation and home exercise are more effective at relieving neck pain in the long term than medications, according to new research. People undergoing spinal manipulation therapy for neck pain also reported greater satisfaction than people receiving medication or doing home exercises. We found that there are some viable treatment options for neck pain, said Gert Bronfort, vice president of research at the Wolfe-Harris Center for Clinical Studies a ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Added Treatment Won't Speed Whiplash Recovery
Aggressive treatment of patients with whiplash doesn t speed their recovery, Canadian research suggests. University of Toronto researchers examined the treatment received by almost 1,700 whiplash patients. They found that increasing the intensity of care to more than two visits to a general practitioner, or adding chiropractic care to general practitioner care, was actually associated with slower recovery. The results, published in the June issue of the jo ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Boomers More Likely to Try Alternative Medicine
Middle-age adults are more likely than older or younger people to use complementary and alternative medicine, says a Wake Forest University School of Medicine study. Researchers analyzed data collected from 31,044 people in the United States who took part in the 2002 National Health Interview Survey. Midlife adults entered adulthood at a time of more widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine CAM in the population and when public health polic ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Kids Follow Parents in Using Alternative Therapies
Children and teens are more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine if their parents also use the therapies, according to new research. A 1997 study found that 42 percent of American adults reported the use of these types of therapies -- and the rates were increasing. But, up till now, there s been little information on the popularity of these treatments among children and teens. Researchers at Metropolitan State University in Minneapolis anal ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28