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Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Although the proper exercise can help people deal with and alleviate chronic neck and back pain, a new study shows that health professionals may not be prescribing it as often as they should. Less than half of the nearly 700 people surveyed -- all of whom had seen a physician, chiropractor or physical therapist in the past year for chronic back or neck pain -- were prescribed exercise, the study found. The results, based on a telephone survey by researcher ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Combining Mainstream, Alternative Therapies Brings Back Pain Relief
Used together, conventional and complementary alternative treatments help patients ease their low back pain better than using mainstream treatment alone, U.S. research shows. The small study included 13 patients who received integrated care and six patients who received usual care. The integrative care team at Brigham and Women s Hospital in Boston included experts in acupuncture, chiropractic, internal medicine, massage therapy, neurology, nursing, nutrit ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Spinal Manipulation, Home Exercise May Ease Neck Pain
Spinal manipulation and home exercise are more effective at relieving neck pain in the long term than medications, according to new research. People undergoing spinal manipulation therapy for neck pain also reported greater satisfaction than people receiving medication or doing home exercises. We found that there are some viable treatment options for neck pain, said Gert Bronfort, vice president of research at the Wolfe-Harris Center for Clinical Studies a ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Added Treatment Won't Speed Whiplash Recovery
Aggressive treatment of patients with whiplash doesn t speed their recovery, Canadian research suggests. University of Toronto researchers examined the treatment received by almost 1,700 whiplash patients. They found that increasing the intensity of care to more than two visits to a general practitioner, or adding chiropractic care to general practitioner care, was actually associated with slower recovery. The results, published in the June issue of the jo ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Boomers More Likely to Try Alternative Medicine
Middle-age adults are more likely than older or younger people to use complementary and alternative medicine, says a Wake Forest University School of Medicine study. Researchers analyzed data collected from 31,044 people in the United States who took part in the 2002 National Health Interview Survey. Midlife adults entered adulthood at a time of more widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine CAM in the population and when public health polic ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Kids Follow Parents in Using Alternative Therapies
Children and teens are more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine if their parents also use the therapies, according to new research. A 1997 study found that 42 percent of American adults reported the use of these types of therapies -- and the rates were increasing. But, up till now, there s been little information on the popularity of these treatments among children and teens. Researchers at Metropolitan State University in Minneapolis anal ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Men's Share of Housework May Depend on Career Choice
How much time a man spends doing housework is related to the type of job he has, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data collected from 1981 to 2009 and found that married or cohabiting men who worked in traditionally female jobs -- such as teaching, child care or nursing -- spent more time doing housework than those in traditionally male jobs. In addition, the wives and partners of these men spent less time doing housework than the wives and partn ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
An estimated 38 percent of U.S. adults and 12 percent of children use some type of complementary and alternative medicine, a new U.S. government survey finds. Complementary and alternative medicine -- sometimes called CAM -- is an umbrella term for a collection of wide-ranging medical and health care systems, practices and products that aren t generally considered conventional medicine. It includes herbal supplements, meditation, chiropractic treatment and ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Many Don't Tell Docs About Using Alternative Therapies for Pain
Many Americans with chronic pain who use alternative therapies -- such as acupuncture -- don t discuss these treatments with their doctors, a new study finds. Our study confirms that most of our patients with chronic pain are seeking complementary treatments to supplement the care we provide in the primary care setting, lead author Dr. Charles Elder, an affiliate investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, said in a Kaiser news releas ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Good Posture: A Stance for Better Health
Healthy posture is important for your well-being, but achieving it can be an uphill battle in a high-tech, high-heeled world, experts say. People who have better posture tend to appear more confident and knowledgeable to others. It makes them feel confident internally as well, said Alynn Kakuk, a physical therapist at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program in Rochester, Minn. Simple exercises and stretching can help your posture, she said. One way to pract ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Yoga Big on West Coast, Chiropractors Popular in Midwest
Folks on the West Coast are faithful followers of yoga and meditation. Midwesterners turn to chiropractors or osteopathic doctors for their aches and pains. And nearly one in every five Americans uses herbal supplements like ginseng, Echinacea, ginkgo biloba and St. John s Wort. Those are just some of the findings of a new federal government report on complementary and alternative medicine trends in the United States. The report, derived from national heal ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Chiropractic Spinal Manipulation Won't Cause Chest Injuries, Study Contends
Chest compressions during chiropractic spinal manipulation result in little or no risk of chest injury, according to new research. The study, published in the May 13 online edition of the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics , measured and examined the force of chest compressions ranging from typical to extremely rigorous and found all to be well under the threshold for injury. Results from this preliminary study showed that maximum chest ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28