Chiropractor News

IOF urges early evaluation of fracture risk in diabetics
This news release is available in Spanish . Nyon, Switzerland - December 2, 2015 Despite an up to six-fold increased risk of broken bones in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus T1DM , the relationship between diabetes and osteoporosis has, until recently, suffered from a general lack of attention and research. As a result, health professionals who treat diabetic patients often do not recognize ...
EurekAlert - Sun. Dec 6
Method of postoperative pain relief may influence recovery from total knee rep...
A new study published today in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association compared outcomes from two types of postoperative pain control methods in a group of patients who had both of their knees replaced. The retrospective study reviewed records of 16 patients who underwent bilateral total knee arthroplasty TKA in which a femoral nerve block was administered at the first operation and a ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Dec 1
Ultrasound reveals knuckle-cracking fireworks
CHICAGO - Research presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America RSNA tackles one of life s great mysteries what causes a knuckle to crack out loud It s extremely common for joints to crack, pop and snap, said Robert D. Boutin, M.D., professor of radiology at University of California, Davis UC Davis Health System. We were interested in pursuing this study becau ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Dec 1
Adults with cerebral palsy more likely to have chronic health conditions
Adults with cerebral palsy CP have higher odds for chronic health conditions such as asthma, hypertension and arthritis compared with adults without CP, according to a study in the December 1 issue of JAMA . Adults with CP represent an increasing population whose health status and health care needs are poorly understood. Mortality records reveal that death due to ischemic heart disease and cancer ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Dec 1
New strategy discovered for treating arthritis
Arthritis patients could one day benefit from a novel form of medicine, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London QMUL . Their early study indicates that arthritic cartilage, previously thought to be impenetrable to therapies, could be treated by a patient s own microvesicles that are able to travel into cartilage cells and deliver therapeutic agents. Microvesicles are very small ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Nov 27
Gene identified that produces benefits of steroids, without the detrimental si...
Scientists have revealed that glucocorticoids, a class of steroid hormones that are commonly prescribed as drugs, enhance muscle endurance and alleviate muscular dystrophy through activation of the gene KLF15. Critically, this pathway is not involved in muscle wasting or the other major detrimental effects of prolonged steroid use. The discovery, published in The Proceedings of the National Academ ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Nov 23
NYU Langone enhances patient experience by reducing referrals to facilities af...
Referring a patient to an acute care facility following major cardiac, joint and spine surgery rather than the patient s own home may not always be necessary--according to findings of a new self-examining study from NYU Langone Medical Center. According to researchers, an approach to post-surgery care that the institution implemented two years ago--which included sharply reducing post-hospital ref ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Nov 23
Study quantifies risk of cardiac arrest in children during spine surgeries
Although the vast majority of pediatric spine surgeries are safe, a handful of neuromuscular conditions seem to fuel the risk of cardiac arrest during such operations, according to research led by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children s Center. A report on the findings, published in the November issue of the journal Spine , is believed to be the first to quantify the risk -- which is quite s ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Nov 19
Brain disorder may increase miscarriage and preeclampsia risk in pregnancy
MINNEAPOLIS - Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, a disease often confused for multiple sclerosis, may increase a woman s risk for miscarriage and preeclampsia during pregnancy, according to a study published in the November 18, 2015, online issue of Neurology reg , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The disorder causes inflammation in the central nervous system, affecti ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Nov 19
Obesity spells problems for trauma patients
ROSEMONT, Ill.--A new study appearing in the November 18 issue of the Journal of Bone Joint Surgery JBJS found a link between obesity and a higher risk for surgery in orthopaedic trauma patients. In addition, researchers found that patients with obesity had longer hospital stays and greater treatment costs. They were also more likely to be discharged to a care facility, rather than to home. Obesit ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Nov 19
Target gene identified for therapies to combat muscular dystrophy
Researchers at the University of S 227 o Paulo s Bioscience Institute IB-USP in Brazil have shown that a gene called Jagged1, or JAG1 for short, could be a target for the development of new approaches to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD , a genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. The research was carried out at the Human Genome Stem Cell Research Center HUG-CELL , o ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Nov 13
'No evidence' that bone-growth agent for spinal fusion increases cancer risk
November 12, 2015 - A new study may alleviate concerns regarding increased cancer risk for patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein rhBMP . The study appears in November 15 issue of Spine , published by Wolters Kluwer . Our study provides further evidence of rhBMP s efficacy as a fusion agent with no evidence of a significantly increased risk of c ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Nov 12